The Region

About Western Australia2nd Place - Wilson - Kangaroo paw in the Royal Balingup Golf course

Arguably the largest state in the world, Western Australia covers one-third of the Australian continent. Spanning over 2.5 million square kilometres (1 million square miles), Western Australia extends into different climatic zones simultaneously. When it is warm and dry in the north of the State, it is cool and wet in the south – that’s how big Western Australia is.

Bordered largely by desert to the east, Western Australia is bound by 12,500 kilometres (7,813 miles) of the world’s most pristine coastline to the west.

Western Australia is adored for its brilliant blue skies, warm sunny climate and white sandy beaches. It is a land blessed with some of the world’s most precious natural phenomena including the dolphins of Monkey Mia, the 350-million-year-old Bungle Bungle range and the towering karri forests of the South West.

Essentially a primary producer, Western Australia has a wealth of natural resources including gold, iron ore, gas and minerals. Perth, the capital city of the State, is home to 1.38 million people and enjoys more hours of sunshine than any other capital city in Australia. Sophisticated yet uncomplicated, the lifestyle in Western Australia is a relaxed one.

The South West

3rd Place - Steytler - Fruit BlossomThe South West Region of Western Australia covers an area of 23,970 square kilometres and is located in the magnificent south west corner of the State. Facing the Indian and Southern Oceans the region is renowned for its seaside playgrounds, surf and famous wines; its interior, aptly describes as Western Australia’s green belt is home to ancient forests and bountiful farmland.

The South West is the most diverse regional economy of the State. Extensive mineral wealth has made the region a major world producer of alumina and mineral sands. The economy is also based on strong agricultural, horticultural and emerging aquaculture industries, timber and forest products, viticulture and tourism. Attractions including national parks, forests, beaches, wineries and eco-tourism sites have credited the region as the most popular tourist destination outside Perth.

More than 123,000 people live in the region and with a growth rate three times that of the national average the South West has one of the fastest growing populations of regional Western Australia.